GoingDeep: Abolade Gbadegesin: Inside Windows Phone "Mango"

GoingDeep

There have been a lot of positive reviewsof the upcoming Windows Phone 7 OS release, code named "Mango." This release is a big one. It contains over 500 new features, is full of improvements - from the core OS to the performance of UI scrolling - and "Mango" puts the user in control of almost eve.

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Episode synopsis

There have been a lot of positive reviews of the upcoming Windows Phone 7 OS release, code named "Mango." This release is a big one. It contains over 500 new features, is full of improvements - from the core OS to the performance of UI scrolling - and "Mango" puts the user in control of almost everything the system has to offer.

"Mango" represents some impressive engineering. Since this is Going Deep, we are necessarily interested in the system-level improvements inside the Windows Phone operating system (in addition meeting a key engineer behind it).

Two new core or system-level features in "Mango" are a generational garbage collector and support for multitasking, or the ability to concurrently run application processes in both the foreground and background. GGC and Multitasking are going to be great for developers and users alike.

How does multitasking in "Mango" work? How is it designed? Let's ask the great Abolade Gbadegesin—a stellar software engineer (writing mostly C++, of course Smiley -> go native!) and key contributor to the Windows Phone operating system, application services, and overall "Mango" platform architecture—to get some real answers. Tune in.

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