GoingDeep: Lars Bak and Steve Lucco: Chakra, V8, JavaScript, Open Source

GoingDeep

Technical Fellow Steve Lucco (architect and lead engineer of IE's Chakra JS VM) and Google's V8 and Dartarchitect Lars Bak discuss JavaScript, from a virtual machine perspective (implementer's view point).IE and Chrome employ different strategies (although they do share some things in com.

Running time
1h51m
File size
39.00MB

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Episode synopsis

Technical Fellow Steve Lucco (architect and lead engineer of IE's Chakra JS VM) and Google's V8 and Dart architect Lars Bak discuss JavaScript, from a virtual machine perspective (implementer's view point).

IE and Chrome employ different strategies (although they do share some things in common) to make JavaScript execute faster. What are these strategies? How do Chakra and V8 differ? How are they similar? How fast can Lars and Steve make JavaScript go, anyway? What's the speed limit for JavaScript execution? What languages are used to write these VMs? (Hint, both start with C...)

This is a candid technical conversation among two excellent software engineers tasked with making JavaScript run as fast as possible in their respective JS VMs. The conversation also includes a brief discussion on open source technologies.

This was filmed at GOTO Aarhus 2012, an excellent developer event. Huge thanks to Lars and Steve for the excellent conversation and to the folks at GOTO for providing a room for me for all these interviews (and lights, too!).

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