Building Windows 8 involves the community in Windows 8 development

Just as they did with their Windows 7 blog, Microsoft is aiming to bring developers from all over the world into their development efforts for the next version, Windows 8, by launching a range of engagement tools.

"We've been hard at work designing and building Windows 8, and today we want to begin an open dialog with those of you who will be trying out the pre-release version over the coming months" wrote Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky on the inaugural post on the "Building Windows 8" (or "B8" for short) blog. "Building the next release of Microsoft Windows is an industry-wide effort that Microsoft approaches with a strong sense of responsibility and humility."

Microsoft has already touted how much of a departure Windows 8 will be from its predecessors. From ARM support through to a completely re-imagined UI, a lot will be changing in the new version. "So much has changed since Windows 95—the last time Windows was significantly overhauled—when the "desktop" metaphor was established."

"[Building Windows 8] is a chance for us to discuss the details and provide a behind the scenes look at the evolution of Windows 8."

It looks like this will be a great opportunity for developers and enthusiastic users in the Windows community to get involved and find out a lot more about how Windows is built and what's going in. Developers will get their first glimpses outside the previous short demos of Windows 8 at the upcoming BUILD conference (replacing MIX this year), and there are even rumours that a Windows 8 build could be available to developers before the end of this year.

You might also like...

Comments

Contribute

Why not write for us? Or you could submit an event or a user group in your area. Alternatively just tell us what you think!

Our tools

We've got automatic conversion tools to convert C# to VB.NET, VB.NET to C#. Also you can compress javascript and compress css and generate sql connection strings.

“The greatest performance improvement of all is when a system goes from not-working to working.” - John Ousterhout